Author

Gutbliss

Browsing

 A new study finds proof that Parkinson’s disease begins in the gut. After injecting specific proteins into the guts of mice, the manifestations of Parkinson’s were observed a month later. The mouse model showed how a protein (alpha synuclein) can travel from the gut to the brain via the vagus nerve and resulted in Parkinson’s symptoms rarely seen in previous animal studies. Neuron Takeaway: While this study acts as the first proof of Parkinson’s gut origin, the hypothesis has been around since 2003 and was originally presented by Dr. Heiko Braak. Scientists are now hoping to conduct studies that uncover how and why this process begins in the first place.

Summer is almost over and we’d like to offer you a simple, microbe-boosting plan to rejuvenate your inner (think gut!) and outer beauty. Below you’ll find our simple, Gutbliss 3-Day Beauty Boost, which includes: A 3-day meal planRecipesLive Dirty lifestyle tips This plan will give you a glow and a feeling of lightness to carry you through the rest of summer.  For even more details on how to cultivate a flourishing gut garden, read Dr. Chutkan’s book, The Microbiome Solution, and you’ll be well on your way to microbial balance and a happier, healthier you. Let’s get started! Lifestyle Tips As you embark on this journey, it’s paramount that you focus on incorporating the following lifestyle recommendations (along with the meal plan) for all three days: Drink eleven 8-ounce cups of water per day for women, and sixteen cups for menReset your circadian rhythm; get in bed when the sun…

In February of this year, we posted an article in our column, Latest Research, regarding the connection between the gut microbiome and blood glucose levels. Research shows that instead of blood glucose response being constant for all foods across all individuals, the gut microbiome actually plays a large role in determining how the body responds to the glucose content in foods – and this response differs for each person. These findings have opened the door to a microbial perspective on precision nutrition, which entails microbiome testing your fecal sample, and then making dietary recommendations based on your specific gut bacteria-modulated blood glucose responses to foods. We are re-presenting this information because more and more people are taking these microbiome tests and based on the results, eliminating wide varieties of nutrient- and microbially-dense, high fiber, plant foods based on their testing results. If you are considering microbiome-based precision nutrition as a…

Alterations in the gut microbiome during infancy are linked to allergies. In a recent study, scientists discover specific gut bacteria strains that act as protection, re-establishing food allergy tolerance. Nature Medicine The study collected fecal samples from 56 infants with allergies every 4 to 6 months and compared the microbial contents to the fecal microbiota of 98 infants without allergies. The healthy and allergic fecal microbiotas were then transferred to a group of mice allergic to eggs – one group of mice received the microbiota from the healthy infants and the other from the allergic infants. Those mice receiving the “healthy” microbiota were more protected against the egg allergy than those receiving the “allergic” microbiota. In addition, scientists identified 6 beneficial gut bacteria strains associated with food allergy protection from the Clostridiales and Bacteroidetes families, then administered an oral formulation of these strains to mice and infants. Those receiving the…

A study published this month finds that micronutrient deficiencies, specifically in zinc, copper, vitamin B12, albumin, and folate, are common in newly diagnosed celiac disease patients, even in the absence of other malabsorption symptoms like weight loss and diarrhea. The study retrospectively analyzed micronutrient status of 30 newly diagnosed celiac patients and compared their data to healthy controls from the National Health & Nutrition Survey (NHANES). Researchers believe that these findings suggest a new paradigm for celiac disease – one that is moving away from the classic symptoms of weight loss, anemia, and diarrhea and more towards “non-classical” symptoms. If you have been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s important to get tested for micronutrient deficiencies. In addition, work with your healthcare practitioner to find the best way to treat these deficiencies. While more research is needed to determine what these treatment strategies are, a nutrient rich diet focused around plant-based…

This all-natural household cleaner is a staple for those practicing the Live Dirty Lifestyle. A natural disinfectant and harmless to the microbiome, mix this cleaner and use for all purposes and in every room in the house! Ingredients ½ cup white vinegar 4 cups of water 12 drops of tea tree oil 12 drops of lavender essential oil Method Combine the ingredients in a spray bottle and shake well before using. Recipe by Dr. Robynne Chutkan. First appeared in The Microbiome Solution (Penguin 2015).

A microbe discovered 15 years ago shows promise in reducing health risks associated with overweightness and obesity in those struggling to lose weight. A study published this month in Nature Medicine used an oral supplementation of Akkermansia muciniphila, a bacteria that breaks down proteins in the intestines, containing ten billion colony forming units (CFUs) in 32 overweight and obese patients. After three months of supplementation, blood markers for liver dysfunction, body inflammation, and total cholesterol were reduced, while insulin sensitivity was improved. Those taking the oral formulation also experienced a 5-pound weight loss. While weight loss was not statistically significant over the time of the study, metabolic markers were significantly improved. Researchers conclude that A. muciniphila is well-tolerated, safe, and could be a meaningful tool in improving the health of obese and overweight patients. Takeaway: While A. muciniphila supplementation may seem worthwhile for improving health parameters in overweight individuals, keep…

“Did you know that when you eat might be just as important as what you eat? Studies show that fasting, also known as intermittent fasting, and not eating after the sun sets can yield vast benefits for your digestion, your microbiome, and even your overall health. Fasting may seem like a scary word, and actually just the sound of it makes me a little bit hungry. I had no idea until I started intermittent fasting a few years ago how beneficial it could be for my gut and overall health…” This video is an excerpt from Dr. Chutkan’s 7-Day Microbiome Reboot. For the complete reboot – which includes the Microbiome Reboot Recipe Booklet (with a meal plan, recipes, and daily tips on microbe-friendly living), and a series of videos that cover Dr. Chutkan’s seven core practices to help build a healthier, more balanced microbiome – sign up today for Gutbliss…

Dr. Chutkan’s homemade facial scrubs for oily and dry skin, which can be found in her bestselling book, Gutbliss (Penguin 2013), are a great, all natural and microbe-friendly face wash. Enjoy these microbe-friendly scrubs once a week and make a larger batch for the entire body! Oily Skin Facial Scrub Ingredients 2 tablespoons raw honey 1 teaspoon oatmeal ½ teaspoon cornmeal ½ teaspoon lemon juice Method Moisten your face and hands with water and mix all the ingredients in the palms of your hands. Gently rub the paste all over your face in a circular motion for 1 minute. The cornmeal and lemon juice are great natural exfoliants, but if you apply too much pressure or scrub too hard, you can irritate your skin. Wash off with lukewarm water and a clean wet washcloth. This facial scrub can be used once a week. Make a larger batch to use on the…

Ever wonder why carrots, romaine lettuce, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and other produce in your local market (whether organic or not), all look and taste the same? It’s all about the seed, and it’s not so good for the health of our bodies or our earth – not to mention our taste buds! New York Times Cutting down on vegetable and fruit variety, while good for the wallets of seed industry leaders, dangerously depletes our nutrient intake, gut bacteria, and soil. Crop varieties are dependent on the seeds used, and with 4 major companies owning 60% of all seeds in the world (50 years ago there were over 1,000 seed companies), as well as an endless list of seed patents and other restrictions, crop diversity is becoming a thing of the past… Or is it? The recently published New York Times article, “Save Our Food. Free the Seed”, brings to light…