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Did you know the recommended age for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is now 45 for the general population (or those at average risk)? The age recommendation (previously 50) changed in May 2018 after researchers analyzed data and found that the rate of new CRC cases is increasing in younger adult populations. This new age recommendation will result in earlier CRC detection and will save more lives. While colonoscopy is the gold standard test for CRC screening and recommended every 10 years between ages 45 and 75 for those at average risk, stool-based tests can also be used, as long as immediate follow-up with a colonoscopy is performed in the presence of an abnormal test. These tests include an annual highly sensitive fecal immunochemical test (FIT), an annual highly sensitive guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (gFOBT), and a multi-targeted stool DNA test (MT-sDNA) every 3 years. For some, screening is recommended…

Is your microbiome test giving you an accurate picture? A recent study looked at one of the most well known markers of microbial health – bacterial diversity. The researchers found that taking 5 fecal samples over 5 consecutive days portrays a more accurate picture of microbial diversity than just 1 sample. This study also concluded that when looking at microbial composition (bacterial species and their ratios), 1 fecal sample was sufficient. In a letter to the editor, a group of researchers argue that microbial composition also varies over time. In their study of 61 infants, fecal samples were taken weekly for 6 weeks. Microbial composition varied over time, even from week to week. Researchers point out that the age of the study participants could be partly to blame. But, they ultimately conclude that calculating an average composition from fecal samples taken over a period of time could offer a more complete portrayal. Current Microbiology →Takeaway: Microbiome testing…