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Low Fiber Diets Wipe Out Gut Bacteria In Current & Future Generations

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Low fiber diets lead to gut bacteria extinction and have lasting effects on gut microbes in current and future generations. Mice studies show that when switching to a low-fiber diet for just 7 weeks, 60% of gut bacteria species dwindle dramatically and remain low even after reintroducing a high-fiber diet. In addition, as generation after generation eats low-fiber diets, the gut bacteria in each subsequent offspring dwindle more and more, leading to species extinction. In fact, when fourth generation low-fiber mice were fed a high-fiber diet, most of the missing microbes did not return. The Atlantic

→Takeaway: “If you pass small stools, you have big hospitals,” Denis Burkitt, an Irish missionary-surgeon during WWII, said as he described the differences between Uganda and America. Small stools are indicative of low fiber diets, and as Burkitt pointed out, increased disease. If you do just one thing for your health, do this: Eat. More. Fiber! Women and men should consume approximately 25 and 38 grams respectively of fiber daily. Hit this number and then some, with whole food vegetables and fruits, nuts and seeds (including quinoa), as well as gluten free whole grains such as brown rice, millet, and amaranth. Start today and never stop, for your health and the health of future generations.

BONUS: Studies show that people lose as much weight by eating more fiber alone than by following complicated diets. If you’re looking to lose weight, increase your fiber intake. And don’t be shy! Populations with some of the most diverse gut microbiota eat as much as 100 grams of fiber daily. A great way to begin is to track your current daily fiber intake, then increase it by 5 to 10 grams each week (and be sure to drink plenty of water to keep things moving in the bathroom!). As stated above, the best fiber comes from whole foods, so avoid packaged fiber and opt for veggies and fruits, with some nuts, seeds, and gluten-free whole grains. Annals of Internal Medicine

Leslie Ann received her BA from the University of Notre Dame and has a Master’s degree in Public Health and Nutrition from Johns Hopkins University. With over a decade of experience working in the health and wellness field as a nutritionist, health writer, and project manager, Leslie Ann is the backbone of the Gutbliss team, overseeing operations as well as the strategic mission of Gutbliss Rx, and authoring much of the content on the site. As a certified yoga teacher and personal trainer, she is an avid believer in integrative methods to treat and heal the body.

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