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Shopping and eating gluten-free is a challenge during the pandemic. We get that. While we always recommend consuming whole foods made in your kitchen, there are also some great gluten-free whole food products such as rice pastas, seeded crackers, and more that are excellent additions to your pantry and can make life a little easier. Below are some of our favorite gluten-free foods for you to utilize during this challenging time. Please note: We do not have a relationship with the below companies and do not receive compensation for recommending their brands. While we’ve included the Amazon link for easy access, most of these items can be purchased at your local grocery stores. Crackers Mary’s Gone Crackers Simple Mills Almond Flour Crackers San-J Tamari Black Sesame Brown Rice Crackers Gluten-Free Norwegian Crispbread Pastas Tinkyada Pasta Joy Ready Brown Rice Pasta Jovial Brown Rice Pasta Eden Foods 100% Buckwheat Soba Noodles…

The pandemic has brought forth challenges for many people dealing with autoimmune diseases and other chronic illnesses. This is also true for those with celiac disease. Many patients are wondering if having celiac disease puts them at a greater risk of coronavirus infection and complications. According to the National Celiac Foundation, in general, those with celiac disease experience the same risk as the general population. But there are some exceptions: Individuals who experience celiac symptoms more often or who experience more severe symptoms are more likely at a higher risk for COVID-19.Those on immunosuppressive drugs such as steroids or biologics are also at a greater risk due to the immune suppressing nature of their medications. If this is you, check out Dr. Chutkan’s discussion with Our Health Talks as well as our webinar on medications during the pandemic, where different classes of medications are addressed, as well as important questions…

Families that have members both with and without celiac disease under one roof often have separate kitchen equipment. But is this something we should be concerned about? Is sharing kitchen equipment used for gluten containing foods safe for those with celiac disease? An October 2019 study sheds light on this common concern. The study tested traces of gluten in gluten-free foods prepared with three common pieces of kitchen equipment: a toaster used for whole wheat bread, a knife used to slice gluten-containing cupcakes, and a pot used to cook wheat-based pasta. When tested, gluten free foods prepared using these kitchen items contained less than 20 parts per million of gluten and in most cases less than 10 parts per million of gluten. According to gluten-free standards, anything less than 20 parts per million is considered gluten-free and can be labeled as such in both the United States and Europe. The…

Some populations have a heightened risk of celiac disease based on the amount of gluten they eat before the age of 5. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed gluten intake in 6,600 children who possessed celiac disease-related genes (deeming these children genetically “at-risk” for celiac disease). Gluten intake was measured using parent-recorded food diaries. Researchers found that children who ate more than 2 grams of gluten per day around the age of 2 had a significant increase in their risk of developing celiac disease. In addition, for every 1 gram of gluten consumed (equivalent to a ½ slice of bread or a ½ cup of cooked pasta) daily beyond the 2 grams, the chance of developing celiac disease increased by 7%. Takeaway: Researchers who conducted the study concluded that those children who have a first-degree relative with celiac disease should limit the amount…

Celiac disease affects approximately 1% of the population in Western countries, yet about 83% of those who suffer from the disease go undiagnosed or are misdiagnosed. In 2019, celiac diagnostic rates are estimated to reach between 50 and 60% due to raising disease awareness. A 2019 study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that screening for celiac disease in first-degree relatives (parents, children, and siblings) of those who have been diagnosed with celiac disease resulted in high diagnostic rates. Out of 360 first-degree relatives of 104 celiac patients screened for the disease, 160 relatives were diagnosed – approximately 44% of the first-degree relatives. It’s important to note that 42 of the diagnosed relatives had no celiac symptoms and 97 had nonclassical symptoms. Many physicians have noted the study findings and are recommending screening for celiac disease in all first-degree relatives of celiac disease patients.

A study published this month finds that micronutrient deficiencies, specifically in zinc, copper, vitamin B12, albumin, and folate, are common in newly diagnosed celiac disease patients, even in the absence of other malabsorption symptoms like weight loss and diarrhea. The study retrospectively analyzed micronutrient status of 30 newly diagnosed celiac patients and compared their data to healthy controls from the National Health & Nutrition Survey (NHANES). Researchers believe that these findings suggest a new paradigm for celiac disease – one that is moving away from the classic symptoms of weight loss, anemia, and diarrhea and more towards “non-classical” symptoms. If you have been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s important to get tested for micronutrient deficiencies. In addition, work with your healthcare practitioner to find the best way to treat these deficiencies. While more research is needed to determine what these treatment strategies are, a nutrient rich diet focused around plant-based…

Jenny didn’t have much in the way of bowel symptoms, just bloating after meals and some constipation. She came in to see me because of severe fatigue, brain fog, thinning hair, and a history of infertility, and she wanted advice on what supplements might be helpful for these problems. As soon as I heard her rattle off this list of seemingly unrelated symptoms, however, I suspected an underlying autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases tend to travel in packs, since whatever is stimulating the immune system likely affects multiple organs, and are most common in women. I have lots of patients with autoimmune combinations like Crohn’s and psoriasis, or celiac disease and hypothyroidism. Jenny’s blood work came back showing slightly abnormal thyroid function consistent with an underactive thyroid, which could definitely explain some of her symptoms. So I sent her to my local go-to thyroid expert. He checked some additional labs that…

While often publicized as a healthful choice, a gluten-free diet (GFD) can have its drawbacks. Based on a talk given by gastroenterologist and celiac disease expert, Dr. Peter Green, studies show that a GFD can result in the following: not enough fiber, low levels of B vitamins, and low iron high salt, fat, and sugar intake gluten contamination (a potential issue for those with celiac disease) increased heavy metals (lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, and tin) increased consumption of corn mycotoxin elevated food costs While these are legitimate concerns, Dr. Chutkan works with a number of celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) patients and has found that the majority of these drawbacks are due to a diet rich in packaged gluten-free foods. With some mindful dietary modifications and additions, these concerns can be addressed and overcome. Low fiber, B vitamins, and iron levels; high salt, fat, and sugar intake Most gluten…

Alternative and complimentary medicine websites make false claims about celiac disease and noncebiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) that may harm patients. A study published this month analyzed celiac disease and NCGS claims made by 500 websites of practitioners in 10 U.S. cities, including those of chiropractors, naturopaths, homeopaths, acupuncturists, and integrative medicine practitioners. The American Journal of Gastroenterology Claims were classified as true, false, or unproven. Of 232 claims made by the practitioners, 138 of them were classified as false or unproven – nearly 60% of all claims. These claims were most often advertising techniques for diagnosing and treating celiac disease and NCGS. Diagnosis and treatment tools for both celiac disease and NCGS are not always readily available from conventional doctors, and therefore, patients often resort to online searches and non-physician medical practitioners to diagnose and treat their symptoms. While some of these practitioners are knowledgeable and their information scientifically based, some are…

Glenn had been on various antibiotics for cystic acne for seventeen years. His skin would initially respond well, but after a year or two the cystic lesions would return, and his dermatologist would switch him to a different antibiotic. Ten years after he first started taking antibiotics Glenn began to have persistent loose stools and weight loss. He experimented with cutting out dairy and tried to increase his calories, but no matter what he ate, he still had diarrhea and trouble gaining weight. Evaluation of his digestive tract eventually revealed a diagnosis of celiac disease, and he was put on a gluten free diet (GFD), which he adhered to strictly. His doctor reassured Glenn that after a few months on the GFD his diarrhea and weight loss would improve, but two years later nothing had changed. Repeat evaluation showed the signs of celiac disease had completely resolved, and his small…