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Green smoothies are Dr. Chutkan’s number one prescribed “medication” in her practice… and there’s lots of reasons why. Watch Dr. Chutkan as she explains the benefits of leafy greens and the importance of consuming them daily for optimal gut health. Be sure to write down the green smoothie recipe at the end and begin incorporating it into your daily life for Gutbliss!

Bloating is generally caused by gas (and sometimes fluid), and it usually ebbs and flows—you may have a flat abdomen in the morning but by evening, you look and feel 6 months pregnant. Bloating has become a rapidly increasing epidemic. For many, the symptoms are daily and relentless, but even when symptoms aren’t severe, they can still be extremely bothersome. There are lots of different causes of bloating, and one of the commonest is excessive sodium intake, which causes you to retain water not just in your abdomen but throughout your body. A study published last month in the American Journal of Gastroenterology looked at data from the DASH-Sodium trial. 412 participants consumed three levels of sodium intake – 50, 100, and 150 mmol/day. Each intake was consumed over a 30-day period with 5 days of rest between each period. Presence of bloating was recorded at baseline and after each…

Madeline: I’m wondering if there is a benefit to taking digestive enzymes, especially since I’m over 60. I’ve read that we create less enzymes as we age. I seem to have more gas since either just getting older or maybe it’s menopause. Dr. Chutkan: You are correct Madeline, we make fewer digestive enzymes as we get older, but that’s to be expected. Lots of other things change as we get older too – our bones get thinner, our sex hormone production decreases, our muscle mass declines, and so on. Those things aren’t medical illnesses – rather, a natural part of aging. Digestion changes as we get older and that’s why enzyme production drops. That’s not an illness or “deficiency” any more than menopause is. There are specific instances when people need digestive enzyme supplementation – certain diseases of the pancreas can decrease production of amylase (digests starch) or lipase (digests…

Summer is almost over and we’d like to offer you a simple, microbe-boosting plan to rejuvenate your inner (think gut!) and outer beauty. Below you’ll find our simple, Gutbliss 3-Day Beauty Boost, which includes: A 3-day meal planRecipesLive Dirty lifestyle tips This plan will give you a glow and a feeling of lightness to carry you through the rest of summer.  For even more details on how to cultivate a flourishing gut garden, read Dr. Chutkan’s book, The Microbiome Solution, and you’ll be well on your way to microbial balance and a happier, healthier you. Let’s get started! Lifestyle Tips As you embark on this journey, it’s paramount that you focus on incorporating the following lifestyle recommendations (along with the meal plan) for all three days: Drink eleven 8-ounce cups of water per day for women, and sixteen cups for menReset your circadian rhythm; get in bed when the sun…

My patient Barbara is a fifty-seven-year-old judge who in the last several years has been very careful about her food: no trans fats, nothing processed, no red meat, organic fruits and vegetables from the farmer’s market, and at least 20 grams of fiber a day. Given her healthy eating habits, she was completely perplexed as to why she was spending the better part of her day in the bathroom. Having a bowel movement had become a full-time job. The morning would get off to a reasonable start: a smallish log right after her morning tea, but things would deteriorate steadily after that with multiple, small, stuttering, pellet-sized poops that looked like rabbit droppings. Each movement was accompanied by an annoying feeling of incomplete emptying. She could feel she had more stool inside, but she couldn’t get it to come out. Invariably, within half an hour, it was back to the…

In February of this year, we posted an article in our column, Latest Research, regarding the connection between the gut microbiome and blood glucose levels. Research shows that instead of blood glucose response being constant for all foods across all individuals, the gut microbiome actually plays a large role in determining how the body responds to the glucose content in foods – and this response differs for each person. These findings have opened the door to a microbial perspective on precision nutrition, which entails microbiome testing your fecal sample, and then making dietary recommendations based on your specific gut bacteria-modulated blood glucose responses to foods. We are re-presenting this information because more and more people are taking these microbiome tests and based on the results, eliminating wide varieties of nutrient- and microbially-dense, high fiber, plant foods based on their testing results. If you are considering microbiome-based precision nutrition as a…

Ginger has a long history of medicinal use to treat a multitude of ailments due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor properties, which have been documented in the scientific literature. Its benefits for gut health are widely publicized, and it is currently used as an integrative approach for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) relief, excessive gas, constipation, bloating, heartburn, motion sickness, gastric ulcers associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like ibuprofen and aspirin), and to improve nutrient absorption, among other conditions. But just how effective is ginger as a treatment and preventative agent for gastrointestinal diseases and conditions? While previous studies have highlighted the gastroprotective effects of ginger, a 2018 study conducted a systemic review of all clinical trials using ginger to treat GI disorders. Results showed that ginger is a safe and effective treatment at a 1500mg daily dosage for nausea relief, specifically nausea and vomiting related to pregnancy. All…

A study published this month finds that micronutrient deficiencies, specifically in zinc, copper, vitamin B12, albumin, and folate, are common in newly diagnosed celiac disease patients, even in the absence of other malabsorption symptoms like weight loss and diarrhea. The study retrospectively analyzed micronutrient status of 30 newly diagnosed celiac patients and compared their data to healthy controls from the National Health & Nutrition Survey (NHANES). Researchers believe that these findings suggest a new paradigm for celiac disease – one that is moving away from the classic symptoms of weight loss, anemia, and diarrhea and more towards “non-classical” symptoms. If you have been diagnosed with celiac disease, it’s important to get tested for micronutrient deficiencies. In addition, work with your healthcare practitioner to find the best way to treat these deficiencies. While more research is needed to determine what these treatment strategies are, a nutrient rich diet focused around plant-based…

“Did you know that when you eat might be just as important as what you eat? Studies show that fasting, also known as intermittent fasting, and not eating after the sun sets can yield vast benefits for your digestion, your microbiome, and even your overall health. Fasting may seem like a scary word, and actually just the sound of it makes me a little bit hungry. I had no idea until I started intermittent fasting a few years ago how beneficial it could be for my gut and overall health…” This video is an excerpt from Dr. Chutkan’s 7-Day Microbiome Reboot. For the complete reboot – which includes the Microbiome Reboot Recipe Booklet (with a meal plan, recipes, and daily tips on microbe-friendly living), and a series of videos that cover Dr. Chutkan’s seven core practices to help build a healthier, more balanced microbiome – sign up today for Gutbliss…