Tag

Nutrition

Browsing

Shopping and eating gluten-free is a challenge during the pandemic. We get that. While we always recommend consuming whole foods made in your kitchen, there are also some great gluten-free whole food products such as rice pastas, seeded crackers, and more that are excellent additions to your pantry and can make life a little easier. Below are some of our favorite gluten-free foods for you to utilize during this challenging time. Please note: We do not have a relationship with the below companies and do not receive compensation for recommending their brands. While we’ve included the Amazon link for easy access, most of these items can be purchased at your local grocery stores. Crackers Mary’s Gone Crackers Simple Mills Almond Flour Crackers San-J Tamari Black Sesame Brown Rice Crackers Gluten-Free Norwegian Crispbread Pastas Tinkyada Pasta Joy Ready Brown Rice Pasta Jovial Brown Rice Pasta Eden Foods 100% Buckwheat Soba Noodles…

This post was written by Michael Goran, PhD, and Emily Venutra, PhD, MPH, authors of the new book Sugarproof. Too much sugar can have broad effects on kids’ bodies and, as they discuss in their new book Sugarproof, kids can be more vulnerable to the harmful effects of too much sugar. Growing kids can have delicate digestive systems. Upset stomachs, aching tummies, and other maladies are hallmarks of childhood, and too much sugar may be a silent contributor to this problem. If your child is having frequent, unexplained tummy problems, one possibility is that they are reacting to excessive amounts of fructose and an inability to absorb it properly from the gut. Fructose is a part of regular white table sugar and also found in concentrated amounts in high fructose corn syrup, fruit juices, other fruit-based sugars like fruit juice concentrates, and agave syrup. In order to transfer glucose or…

As we’re hunkered down at home, some of us have seen an influx of processed foods creeping into our kitchens… and mouths! Well, here’s some incentive to get the COVID junk out of the house once and for all. Researchers at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain found that ultra-processed foods (think pastries, processed meats, and ice cream) accelerate the aging process. The scientists involved in the study conducted a cross-sectional study in 866 individuals, aged 57 to 91 years, and looked at the relationship between diet and telomere length, a marker for aging. Telomeres are short nucleotide sequences found on the end of chromosomes that protect genetic information. They shorten with each cell division, which creates the process of aging. So shorter telomere length means increased aging, and this shortening (aka aging) can be accelerated with environmental factors, including the daily consumption of ultra-processed foods. Processed food intake…

Could quarantining put you at a higher risk for disease? Studies and data analysis show that the best way to protect yourself and others from coronavirus is isolation. But could the practices of self-isolation, quarantining, and extreme social distancing put you at a higher risk for health conditions over the long term? The surprising answer is it may. Not only has the pandemic increased our over-sanitization, the very thing that, over the last century, has so dramatically (and negatively) affected the beneficial microbes that are essential to our health, but it has also brought on a complete change of lifestyle for most of us – less exercise, more unhealthy foods, added stress and the anxiety of juggling dwindling finances, job loss, homeschooling, and a lack of childcare, as well as inadequate sleep quality and quantity. All of these factors create a perfect storm for weight gain, increased disease risk, and…

Raw milk, by definition, is milk from grass-fed cows that is both unpasteurized and un-homogenized (the pasteurization process is a high heat treatment that kills any bacteria and potential pathogens in the milk, while the homogenization process is a mechanical process that distributes the fat particles evenly throughout the milk so that it’s blended uniformly). And because it doesn’t go through these nutrient-degrading processes before human consumption, it’s marketed as containing all of the “healthy” stuff that are destroyed in conventional milks during the pasteurization and homogenization processes, such as natural enzymes, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and beneficial bacteria for the gut. Yet, a recent study found that raw milk might not be the super food some health circles believe it is. The study, published this summer in Microbiome Journal, looked at 2,304 pasteurized and unpasteurized milk samples across 5 states. Results showed that raw milk contains little to no…

David: I had constant problems with acne, leaky gut, and digestive upset. I read The Microbiome Solution a year ago, reduced meat to once a month, eliminated sugar and grains, and my meals now consist of a wide variety of vegetables, legumes, wild plants, fruits, and seeds, although most of what I consume is vegetables and fruits. My digestion has stabilized and my acne is gone! I feel great and rested like never before. However, when I exercise, after about 30 minutes I run out of energy and feel weak and tired. Yet, the next morning when I get out of bed there are no signs of fatigue whatsoever. Any advice on why I feel so fatigued when I exercise and how to fix it? Dr. Chutkan: David, when we completely eliminate grains from the diet, we are depriving our bodies (and microbes!) of complex carbohydrates that can be an important energy source for…

This is a confusing time for those of us who are cautious of over-sanitizing our bodies. How do we live a “dirty” lifestyle to promote microbial and immune health, while protecting ourselves from infection, and more specifically, from the coronavirus? At Gutbliss, “live dirty” is still our motto, even during the pandemic. Here’s why… and how to do it. As James Hamblin points out in his latest article published in the July/August issue of The Atlantic, You’re Showering Too Much, we have never been more obsessed with cleanliness, yet autoimmune-associated skin conditions, such as eczema, rosacea, and psoriasis, and even acne, are on the rise and more unsolvable than ever with modern medicine. So, what’s the deal? Could it be that over-washing is causing a bacterial imbalance (or dysbiosis) on the skin, triggering these conditions to take hold? Skin health, as with gut health, is all about microbial balance –…

Lindsay: I saw a compelling study linking the ketogenic diet to reducing inflammation in the gut and improving microbial parameters. I realize you’ve been against keto diets in the past. To me, ketones seem to be beneficial for gut health. Can you elaborate on the study and your take on it? Dr. Chutkan: Lindsay, the study you’re referring to, Ketogenic diets alter gut microbiomes in humans, mice, was published in May of this year and was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco. Probably the trendiest diet of 2020, the ketogenic diet is a very low carb, high fat way of eating, which keeps the body in a metabolic state called ketosis, in which the body burns fat for energy instead of carbohydrates and transforms fat cells into ketones in the liver, which act as an energy source for the brain. Some preliminary scientific evidence shows that a ketogenic diet may…