Tag

Microbiome

Browsing

Recent research has demonstrated the potential prognostic and therapeutic roles of microbiota in COVID-19 infections. Leading the way in researching, and educating through their popular course “Clinical Applications of Microbiota,” join Georgetown faculty experts for a discussion examining the dynamic relationship between the microbiota and disease expression, particularly in relation to gut health and the novel coronavirus. This discussion features: Moderator: Douglas Varner, MS, MLS, Assistant Dean for Information Management, Dahlgren Memorial LibraryRobynne Chutkan, MD, FASGE, Founder, Digestive Center for Wellness, LLC Kate Michel, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, Georgetown University; KL2 Scholar, Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences Sona Vasudevan, Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Georgetown University Medical Center This program was co-hosted by Georgetown Health magazine and the Georgetown University Alumni Association. Copy provided by Georgetown Alumni Webinars

There are lots of diets out there, and many of us have tried one or two of them – maybe with some success… or maybe not. If you’re anything like me, the number one quality I want in my diet is how easy it is to maintain. Many of us diet, lose lots of weight, and then gain it back (with a little extra, in many cases) because whatever diet we tried wasn’t sustainable over a long period of time. This is the very reason why we love the vegan approach to weight loss. For one, it’s incredibly nutrient and microbe rich and does wonders for the gut microbiome and for your overall health and disease risk. But if all you care about is your waistline right now (especially after possibly overindulging during the pandemic), don’t fret. A vegan diet proves effective in promoting sustained weight loss too! A recent…

Gerry: I am an avid follower of Gutbliss and was making and drinking green smoothies almost daily, then I began having intestinal issues, diarrhea etc. I ran across some experts talking about the dangers of ingesting too many foods high in oxalates. So, I’m confused. I’ve since given up eating spinach and Swiss chard and try to mostly eat vegetables and foods lower in oxalates, including fewer nuts and seeds. I’ve been eating more animal protein, pasture raised meats, eggs and dairy products. Now after many months my GI tract is returning to normal and I feel much better. How can it be that all these foods promoted as “health foods” are not good for everyone? I do want to add that I’ve been under an inordinate amount of stress that has probably put lots of strain on my whole body, but especially my GI system. Dr. Chutkan: Gerry, first and foremost, I’m so…

When C-section born infants are given a cocktail of poo plus breast milk, their microbiomes look very similar to their vaginally-born counterparts. C-section-born infants have very different gut microbiomes than those born vaginally. Current research points to the hypothesis that these differences put C-section-born infants at a significantly higher risk for disease and less optimal overall health later in life. In a recent study, researchers orally administered small amounts of maternal fecal matter, mixed with breastmilk, to 7 C-section-born infants and found that their gut bacteria were transformed into a microbiome quite similar to those born vaginally. Cell Takeaway: While vaginal seeding (swabbing the mother’s vagina and administering the swab to the infant’s mouth) has shown minimal results in colonizing the C-section born infant’s gut microbiome, this method of FMT proves much more effective in colonizing the gut with beneficial microbes. This proof-of-concept study is the first of its kind…

New research helps us better understand the causes and trends in the obesity epidemic – and what you can do within your own family to help manage weight. Approximately 42% of the adult population in the U.S. is obese, and obesity triples the risk of being hospitalized for COVID, so understanding the risk factors and treatments for obesity are important. Here are some of the latest studies on important, actionable themes in preventing and treating obesity. Probiotics may help manage childhood obesity. Over 340 million children are obese worldwide, and almost 20% (or one fifth!) of children in the United States are obese. Obesity in early life puts children at an increased risk for obesity in adulthood, as well as a whole host of diseases later in life. A recent study found that the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve (a beneficial gut bacteria strain that produces short chain fatty acids and…

Could quarantining put you at a higher risk for disease? Studies and data analysis show that the best way to protect yourself and others from coronavirus is isolation. But could the practices of self-isolation, quarantining, and extreme social distancing put you at a higher risk for health conditions over the long term? The surprising answer is it may. Not only has the pandemic increased our over-sanitization, the very thing that, over the last century, has so dramatically (and negatively) affected the beneficial microbes that are essential to our health, but it has also brought on a complete change of lifestyle for most of us – less exercise, more unhealthy foods, added stress and the anxiety of juggling dwindling finances, job loss, homeschooling, and a lack of childcare, as well as inadequate sleep quality and quantity. All of these factors create a perfect storm for weight gain, increased disease risk, and…

Raw milk, by definition, is milk from grass-fed cows that is both unpasteurized and un-homogenized (the pasteurization process is a high heat treatment that kills any bacteria and potential pathogens in the milk, while the homogenization process is a mechanical process that distributes the fat particles evenly throughout the milk so that it’s blended uniformly). And because it doesn’t go through these nutrient-degrading processes before human consumption, it’s marketed as containing all of the “healthy” stuff that are destroyed in conventional milks during the pasteurization and homogenization processes, such as natural enzymes, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and beneficial bacteria for the gut. Yet, a recent study found that raw milk might not be the super food some health circles believe it is. The study, published this summer in Microbiome Journal, looked at 2,304 pasteurized and unpasteurized milk samples across 5 states. Results showed that raw milk contains little to no…