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Longevity

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“Did you know that when you eat might be just as important as what you eat? Studies show that fasting, also known as intermittent fasting, and not eating after the sun sets can yield vast benefits for your digestion, your microbiome, and even your overall health. Fasting may seem like a scary word, and actually just the sound of it makes me a little bit hungry. I had no idea until I started intermittent fasting a few years ago how beneficial it could be for my gut and overall health…” This video is an excerpt from Dr. Chutkan’s 7-Day Microbiome Reboot. For the complete reboot – which includes the Microbiome Reboot Recipe Booklet (with a meal plan, recipes, and daily tips on microbe-friendly living), and a series of videos that cover Dr. Chutkan’s seven core practices to help build a healthier, more balanced microbiome – sign up today for Gutbliss…

Overview Intermittent fasting (IF) – typically defined as anywhere from 12 to 18 hours without food in each 24 hour period OR full days of fasting interspersed throughout the week – is a dietary pattern that focuses on when to eat, not what to eat. Research has linked IF to a myriad of health benefits, including weight loss, improved brain function and inflammatory markers, reduced insulin resistance and heart disease risk, cancer prevention, and anti-aging. While this list is impressive, studies on IF are in their early stages and are limited due to the lack of human, randomized controlled studies, small sample sizes, short study periods, and minimal follow-up with subjects. Despite these limitations, IF exemplifies many positives and could be a viable and healthy weight loss option for some individuals. There are three main methods of practicing IF (on non-fasting days/times, there are no restrictions, caloric or otherwise): 1). Time restricted feeding–…

Gardening could be just as important in living longer as diet, exercise, and social connection. Researchers found that gardening is a common theme amongst centurions living in blue zones (areas of the world with the highest number of people over 100 years of age), and that those in their 60’s who garden regularly have a 32% lower risk of dementia. Scientists hypothesize that the longevity effects of gardening are due to a myriad of factors – ample exposure to green spaces and dirt, both proven to have healing effects on mental and physical health; a social connectedness to the broader community through farmers markets; and a healthier diet through the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and herbs produced in a local garden. BBC →Takeaway: If you’re looking for a new hobby in 2019, gardening should be at the top of your list. Whether you have a green thumb or not, giving it a go and…

Spain is predicted to have the longest average life expectancy in the world at 85.8 years by 2040. Why? While diet plays a big role – the Spanish typically follow a Mediterranean diet with a large rotation of seasonal vegetables and fruits – so do social and familial relationships, which are at the center of Spanish life. Unfortunately, the same study shows the U.S. falling from 43rd to 64th place with an average life expectancy of 79.8 years. The Lancet →Takeaway: What can we take from the Spaniards in living longer and healthier lives? When assessing your 2019 health goals and New Year’s resolutions, along with a plant-based diet, focus on increasing your social interactions and connectedness to others.

A recent study, conducted over 15 years in individuals 90 years of age and older, finds that drinking alcohol on a regular basis is more effective in increasing longevity than exercise. Those who drank 1 to 2 glasses of wine or beer daily were 18 percent less likely to die a premature death, while those who exercised daily were 11% less likely. While the lead researcher says she is not able to explain these findings, she firmly believes that moderate drinking improves longevity. The 90+ Study →Takeaway: This study comes out just months after The American Society of Clinical Oncology released a statement in The Journal of Clinical Oncology citing evidence of the link between light drinking and increased cancer risk. In this statement, top cancer doctors urge individuals to drink less to decrease cancer risk and for those who don’t drink, don’t start. While science can often contradict itself, at Gutbliss, we recommend…