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“Exercise is one of the best ways to improve your gut health. Like I’m fond of saying, if you’re not moving, neither are your bowels. Runners and other people who exercise regularly actually have better bowel movements, not as hard, bigger, and more frequent – what I like to call stool nirvana. A January 2018 University of Illinois study sheds light on why exercise might be so important for our gut, as well as overall health. The study found that exercise alone can positively alter the gut microbiome…” Watch the video to learn more! While exercise has incredible benefits for the microbiome, can it help you lose weight? Check out our article Does Exercise Help You Lose Weight.

“Did you know that when you eat might be just as important as what you eat? Studies show that fasting, also known as intermittent fasting, and not eating after the sun sets can yield vast benefits for your digestion, your microbiome, and even your overall health. Fasting may seem like a scary word, and actually just the sound of it makes me a little bit hungry. I had no idea until I started intermittent fasting a few years ago how beneficial it could be for my gut and overall health…” This video is an excerpt from Dr. Chutkan’s 7-Day Microbiome Reboot. For the complete reboot – which includes the Microbiome Reboot Recipe Booklet (with a meal plan, recipes, and daily tips on microbe-friendly living), and a series of videos that cover Dr. Chutkan’s seven core practices to help build a healthier, more balanced microbiome – sign up today for Gutbliss…

Dr. Chutkan’s homemade facial scrubs for oily and dry skin, which can be found in her bestselling book, Gutbliss (Penguin 2013), are a great, all natural and microbe-friendly face wash. Enjoy these microbe-friendly scrubs once a week and make a larger batch for the entire body! Oily Skin Facial Scrub Ingredients 2 tablespoons raw honey 1 teaspoon oatmeal ½ teaspoon cornmeal ½ teaspoon lemon juice Method Moisten your face and hands with water and mix all the ingredients in the palms of your hands. Gently rub the paste all over your face in a circular motion for 1 minute. The cornmeal and lemon juice are great natural exfoliants, but if you apply too much pressure or scrub too hard, you can irritate your skin. Wash off with lukewarm water and a clean wet washcloth. This facial scrub can be used once a week. Make a larger batch to use on the…

Ever wonder why carrots, romaine lettuce, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and other produce in your local market (whether organic or not), all look and taste the same? It’s all about the seed, and it’s not so good for the health of our bodies or our earth – not to mention our taste buds! New York Times Cutting down on vegetable and fruit variety, while good for the wallets of seed industry leaders, dangerously depletes our nutrient intake, gut bacteria, and soil. Crop varieties are dependent on the seeds used, and with 4 major companies owning 60% of all seeds in the world (50 years ago there were over 1,000 seed companies), as well as an endless list of seed patents and other restrictions, crop diversity is becoming a thing of the past… Or is it? The recently published New York Times article, “Save Our Food. Free the Seed”, brings to light…

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) receives an FDA safety alert due to adverse reactions in two individuals who underwent FMT and received stool from the same donor. The stool, infected with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) – a multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO) and therefore very challenging to treat – was administered to two immunocompromised adults, resulting in one death. FDA Takeaway: The FDA identified that more screening is needed throughout the stool donor process, including specific questions addressing risk factors for MDRO stool colonization and rejection for those donors who are at high risk – as well as testing for MDRO colonization in donor stool. FMT is an FDA approved therapy for recurrent C. diff. While research shows that FMT may result in positive improvements for some other conditions – inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis), infectious diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and severe antibiotic-associated diarrhea – the…

The placenta could be the surprising reason why so many women get autoimmune diseases – even in women who have never been pregnant. Women are diagnosed with 80% of all autoimmune diseases in the U.S. Humans in hunter-gatherer communities have an average of 8 to 12 children – a stark contrast to today’s U.S. average, which is less than 2 children. During these years of childbearing, the placenta sends signals to the immune system to weaken in order to prevent rejection of the fetus. This constant weakening of immunity could be dangerous for the mother, so it’s hypothesized that other aspects of the female immune system are programmed to ramp up during adulthood to compensate (women actually contain more immunity genes than men, possibly for this very reason). It’s possible that because our bodies have evolved to bear such large numbers of children over hundreds of thousands of years, the…

Scientists have created E. coli bacteria using a 100% man-made genome. While the bacteria is “unusually shaped and reproducing slowly”, scientists say it’s alive and is four million base pairs long, four times larger than the synthetic genome built 9 years ago. The study was conducted so that scientists could better understand how living things code genetic information. Researchers believe this is possibly a first step in creating organisms that produce and deliver medicine and may also answer questions about the origin of the genetic code and how and why it’s constructed in such a “redundant” way. New York Times

Alternative and complimentary medicine websites make false claims about celiac disease and noncebiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) that may harm patients. A study published this month analyzed celiac disease and NCGS claims made by 500 websites of practitioners in 10 U.S. cities, including those of chiropractors, naturopaths, homeopaths, acupuncturists, and integrative medicine practitioners. The American Journal of Gastroenterology Claims were classified as true, false, or unproven. Of 232 claims made by the practitioners, 138 of them were classified as false or unproven – nearly 60% of all claims. These claims were most often advertising techniques for diagnosing and treating celiac disease and NCGS. Diagnosis and treatment tools for both celiac disease and NCGS are not always readily available from conventional doctors, and therefore, patients often resort to online searches and non-physician medical practitioners to diagnose and treat their symptoms. While some of these practitioners are knowledgeable and their information scientifically based, some are…

Does a microbiome exist in utero, or is the environment sterile up to the moment the baby exits the womb? This has been an area of much debate in the scientific community. While some studies show the intrauterine environment to be sterile, others have uncovered bacteria in the uterus and placenta, showing that an intrauterine microbiome does in fact exist. A new review study adds evidence to the idea that if colonized, the intrauterine environment is contaminated. Researchers of the study propose that maternal stress causes a disruption of bacteria in one region of the mother’s body – oral cavity, gut, or vagina – triggering the transfer of bacteria (or what scientists refer to as bacterial translocation) to the intrauterine environment. This transfer of bacteria, scientists believe, may trigger an immune (or inflammatory) response that leads to neurodevelopment insufficiencies in the fetus. Science Direct Takeaway: While we are far from uncovering the truth…

A high level of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) dramatically reduces the risk of getting lung and colorectal cancer (CRC) and significantly increases survival rates. In one of the most diverse retrospective cohort studies, researchers analyzed data from over 49,000 participants with a median age of 54 years. Those with the highest CRF levels (>12 METs, measured using a treadmill stress test) possessed a 77% lower risk of lung cancer and a 61% lower risk of CRC than those with the lowest fitness levels (<6 METs). Participants diagnosed with cancer who were in the highest CRF range prior to diagnosis also saw great benefits. Following diagnosis, those with lung cancer had a 44% lower risk of all-cause mortality and those with CRC, an 89% lower risk, compared to those who were less fit. American Cancer Society Takeaway: Researchers who conducted the study believe that these results act as some of the strongest evidence…