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Shopping and eating gluten-free is a challenge during the pandemic. We get that. While we always recommend consuming whole foods made in your kitchen, there are also some great gluten-free whole food products such as rice pastas, seeded crackers, and more that are excellent additions to your pantry and can make life a little easier. Below are some of our favorite gluten-free foods for you to utilize during this challenging time. Please note: We do not have a relationship with the below companies and do not receive compensation for recommending their brands. While we’ve included the Amazon link for easy access, most of these items can be purchased at your local grocery stores. Crackers Mary’s Gone Crackers Simple Mills Almond Flour Crackers San-J Tamari Black Sesame Brown Rice Crackers Gluten-Free Norwegian Crispbread Pastas Tinkyada Pasta Joy Ready Brown Rice Pasta Jovial Brown Rice Pasta Eden Foods 100% Buckwheat Soba Noodles…

While regular exercise has long been accepted as a preventative measure for just about every disease and condition out there, including premature death, studies are finding that exercise may play a therapeutic role in combating some of today’s most threatening diseases, including cancer. It may seem counterintuitive for sick, cancer patients on potent drugs, already exhausted from treatment, to fatigue their bodies even more in daily intensive exercise sessions. But researchers are finding that these sessions are saving patients’ lives. As presented in an article that appeared in The Scientist in April, exercise fights cancer in many different ways. During exercise, muscles release myokines that decrease cancer proliferation, dampening tumor growth and metastasis. Stress hormones, epinephrine and norepinephrine, are also increased, which act directly on cancerous tumors and release immune cells into the bloodstream. Epinephrine triggers the release of natural killer (NK) cells into the bloodstream, and both hormones are…

Prebiotic and probiotic supplements may improve depression symptoms; a June 2020 review study shows. Scientists analyzed 7 of the highest quality studies conducted in the last 15 years assessing the effectiveness of single and multi-strain pre- and probiotics in improving depressive symptoms in patients with a clinical diagnosis of depression. Researchers included only those studies that used quantitative measurements to categorize symptoms. BMJ Takeaway: Results of all 7 studies (using a combination of prebiotics alone, probiotics alone, and prebiotics and probiotics together) showed statistically significant improvements in depression symptoms and/or clinically significant improvements in biochemical measurements for depression. While this study sheds light on depressive disorders, it doesn’t tell us whether anxiety disorders would respond similarly. The verdict is still out and more studies are needed. The other important point to keep in mind is that just like with digestive disorders, simply popping a prebiotic/probiotic pill won’t improve your symptoms.…

Fasting plasma blood glucose levels (FPG) at hospital admission independently predicts COVID-19 complications and death in those without diabetes. Scientists looked back at the FPG levels at hospital admission in 605 COVID-19 patients in Wuhan. Those with a FPG of 126 mg/dL or higher were nearly 4 times more likely to experience COVID-19 complications compared to those with a FPG less than 110 mg/dL. Annals of Internal Medicine Takeaway: Because FPG proves to be such a strong, independent predictor of COVID-19 complications and mortality, researchers who conducted the study recommend glycemic testing and control at hospital admission for all COVID-19 patients, even for those who don’t have a previous diabetes diagnosis. Testing and controlling blood sugar can help in assessing COVID-19 severity and mortality risk, as well as improve survival outcomes. Are you concerned about your risk for developing high blood glucose levels and diabetes? If so, a study published…

Scientific evidence links COVID-19 transmission with fecal aerosols. A recent study, published in Annals of Internal Medicine, explored an outbreak in a high-rise apartment building in Guangzhou, China. The outbreak infected 9 individuals living in different units throughout the building. Through patient interviews, throat swabs, and an in-depth environmental investigation, researchers found that transmission most likely occurred in the master bathrooms of the apartments, which were connected through drainage vents. Fecal bio-aerosols most likely leaked, travelling from one apartment to another through the bathroom drainage pipes. Annals of Internal Medicine Takeaway: To prevent future outbreaks of this kind, scientists who conducted the study recommend immediately resolving any leaks that exist within sewage drainage systems. This will prevent bio-aerosols from escaping and becoming a hazard. The findings in this study add to the growing evidence that COVID-19 and other infectious diseases can be spread through wastewater plumbing systems, especially those in…

This is a confusing time for those of us who are cautious of over-sanitizing our bodies. How do we live a “dirty” lifestyle to promote microbial and immune health, while protecting ourselves from infection, and more specifically, from the coronavirus? At Gutbliss, “live dirty” is still our motto, even during the pandemic. Here’s why… and how to do it. As James Hamblin points out in his latest article published in the July/August issue of The Atlantic, You’re Showering Too Much, we have never been more obsessed with cleanliness, yet autoimmune-associated skin conditions, such as eczema, rosacea, and psoriasis, and even acne, are on the rise and more unsolvable than ever with modern medicine. So, what’s the deal? Could it be that over-washing is causing a bacterial imbalance (or dysbiosis) on the skin, triggering these conditions to take hold? Skin health, as with gut health, is all about microbial balance –…

Ingredients For the chickpeas: 1 ¾ cups cooked chickpeas (equivalent to a 15 ounce can)2 T olive oil1 tsp smoked paprika1 tsp cumin1 pinch cayenne pepper½ tsp chili powder For the broccoli: Broccoli¼ cup vegetable brothSalt and pepper For serving: 1 cup raw long grain brown rice, or quinoa1 avocadoDiced purple cabbageBBQ sauce for serving Method Chickpeas: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. In a mixing bowl, combine the chickpeas, olive oil, paprika, cumin, chili powder, and cayenne until evenly coated. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cook for 20 minutes. Shake the pan halfway through to ensure the chickpeas are evenly roasted. Rice/quinoa: While the chickpeas cook, make the rice or quinoa on your stovetop as directed on the package. Broccoli: Place ¼ cup of broth in a sauté pan. Turn the heat to medium. Cut your broccoli into bite-size florets and sauté until desired…